Ship Sticks – Ship Your Clubs Hassle-Free

This is a sponsored article from Ship Sticks

You’re about to embark upon the golf trip of a lifetime, playing courses you’ve only dreamed of playing. Your itinerary is set; you know where your staying, you’ve got your tee times all lined up, and, thanks to Google Maps, you even have a pretty good idea of where you’ll be having that first libation. But have you given any thought to the best way to transport your golf clubs?

These days, the airlines seem to wreak havoc on golf equipment. Maybe the airline workers are jealous that you’re going off to play while they work; who knows? One thing I do know is that on one trip overseas to Scotland, my brand new soft-sided bag was rendered totally useless by the time I returned to the States. One wheel was broken beyond repair, there were numerous tears in it and the zipper was broken. As far as I could tell, the contents were all there, although I have heard stories of people missing shoes, gloves even clubs when they got home. My point is that the airlines don’t seem to care about your precious cargo.

OK, let’s pretend that your clubs make it through to your destination unscathed; the fun is just beginning. In addition to the other luggage you brought, you’ve just added a piece that is both heavy and awkward to handle. If you have to walk any great distance, you could be looking at a couple of trips just to get your stuff to the curb. Does this sound like the start you had planned for your uber-golf vacation? But wait, there is an answer to your lament – Ship Sticks.

The business platform for shipping only sports equipment is not new; several companies have come and gone or merged with others in the past several years. Many impostures have tried to replicate the successes that Ship Sticks has had, but none have been able to crack the code. Companies such as UPS and Fed Ex have gotten into the game too, but don’t say I didn’t warn you when you see the cost.

Ship Sticks is a company which has absolutely streamlined the golf club shipping process. Start by going online to their site (www.ShipSticks.com), enter where you want the clubs picked up and where you want them sent and you’ll receive an instant quote. If it looks good to you, click on SHIP NOW and the process has begun. Fill in the form on the next page – who you are, where you are and where you’re going, the pick-up and delivery dates and your credit card information and you’re all set.  Your order information and shipping labels are automatically emailed to you. All you do is attach the label to your travel case and wait for Ship Sticks to arrive. Odds are that you’ll hear from a customer service rep before they get there; that’s just what they do. Your clubs are picked up, shipped and waiting for you at your destination. When you’re ready to leave, repeat the process. Depending on where you’re at, it may be as simple as placing the label on your travel case and leaving them in your hotel room. Worst case scenario, you leave them at the concierge desk.

Say your clubs for some unforeseen reason aren’t there when you’re ready to tee off (it could happen). Ship Sticks will give you a $200 credit for rental clubs, balls, shoes, etc. so you can keep your appointed tee time. They also provide complimentary insurance of $1,000 at no charge and $500 for each additional piece you shipped with them. You can purchase additional coverage at the rate of $3.75 per $500, up to $3,500.

There you have it. Ship Stick’s mission is to provide a value added service to the golf industry and create a win/win situation for all involved. If using the Internet isn’t your thing, call them at (855)-867-9915. You can also email them at [email protected] or you can chat with them live on the website www.shipsticks.com. Take the hassle out of your next golf trip, ship with Ship Sticks.

About Author

David Theoret

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